Iraq And Syria

It’s a pity, nobody has called me from Washington yet to get my valuable insight on the grim happenings in Syria, which have clawed its way into a seemingly tranquil Europe.

So you guys are it: my audience.

Nothing further needs to be said about a people, who made available to us the profound ideas of equality, fraternity, and liberty: concepts rooted in a Judeo-Christian ideology.

Never mind, the French may have given up on the Christian part of it long ago, but the tenets remain, etched into the French psyche. The beautiful Notre dame, a structure we visited in 1974 with our infant daughter nisha, is sitting there very pretty and very empty.

So after the killing spree at the offices of the French cartoonists in January of this year, the French were said to be despairing over the stubborn resistance to assimilation on the part of the millions, whom they welcomed to their land, to live and to let live.

The next thing they knew, those very rights they fought a revolution over, 4 centuries ago, had become endangered, or been put on the threshold of being eliminated altogether.

The Bikini or the Burqa.

That clash of values catapulted us to what happened last week.

As we see all sorts of added and painful security measures being elevated all over Europe, and across the Atlantic, questions have arisen over how to handle the refugee migrants from a God-forsaken place called Syria.

Ironically, and aside from the rest of the story at hand, some of us call ourselves ‘Syrian Christians’. I don’t think there are any Christians left in Syria. Perhaps we should rename ourselves ‘Suriyani christhianis’. only the ‘suriyanis’ will know what to make of that term.

Anyway, instead of vilifying the governors and the presidential candidates for suggesting we put a lid on the ‘Great Migration’, I have come up with the following. I’m sure some of you are going to tell me, ‘you’re kidding, right’? and it’s ok to do that, and I am not.

Google came to my aid, and I discovered that there are roughly 350,000 Christian congregations in the U.S.

Assuming most of them possess their own sanctuaries, I propose that each of the churches adopt one refugee family each, and house them right in their sanctuaries. Giving sanctuary in a sanctuary.

If you think I’m being facetious, I am not.

In return for this, this guest family can help the churches with moderate amounts of housekeeping, until they’re on their feet, and can move onward. Kind of like W’s ‘Faith Initiative’. and it’s 340,000 more than what the president is edicting.

and on that note: what’s up with the president going abroad, and going around questioning Ted Cruz’s patriotism? isn’t it the same as when his patriotism was called into question? the Filipinos are probably confused.

All the vetting, that word we’re hearing a lot these days, (initially I thought this meant putting some water over the head of these people ), will be the responsibility of the sponsoring church. And the church will also be liable for any adverse outcomes.

Thanksgiving is fast approaching and I have a story to tell. Just bear with me a bit more.

Once a time long ago, I was the food co-coordinator for my church Carmel MarThoma. poor folks, they haven’t got over it yet, and have not invited me back to repeat the performance.

thanksgiving rolled around that year, and I foolishly came up with the the novel idea of us, the church folks, preparing the whole thanksgiving meal, turkey and the sides, and openly inviting the Hudson townspeople to share it with us.

I was surprised by the resistance to the proposal, on the grounds of safety mainly, and other matters. I’m not blaming anyone. I haven’t invited townsfolk to my house, ever. I’m just suggesting, we have a different approach when something directly impacts our daily lives.

It’s getting a little tiresome to be repeatedly exhorted of our Christian duty to care for the least advantaged. No argument there. It’s right there in Matthew’s Gospel. This may be arguably the most quoted Gospel verse. No problem with that either.

but is it possible, Jesus may have meant, we the individuals, you and I, take care of this? and not putting it on Caesar’s head, and be done with it?

as a fact, Jesus never exhorted Caesar to do anything.

Next point in this business of the blame game is, that of giving preference to ‘Christian’ refugees.

We can opt out of this dilemma by offering to take people over 50, with no extended families accompanying them. No religious litmus test will then be necessary. It will still be better than the ‘all or nothing’ stand.

Some of us are suffering from this malady called, The Bias of Lowered Expectations (BLE). What is good for the goose is not good for the gander. Some are expected to do only the ‘least of their best’.

why don’t we expect Saudi Arabia to take in half the number of refugees, with whom they share a religion, language, and a culture, that are being sent to Europe? Why is it OK for the Saudis to stand idly by, but not for the Europeans? Isn’t caring for widows and orphans mandated in their holy book?

I wonder if Jesus said anything about double standards? WWJS(ay)?

Apostle Paul was a supremely learned Jew, a pharisee, on his way to Damascus in Syria, to kill the newly minted Christians in AD 33 or so, but lucky for us, he had an Encounter With A Good Jew and he had a change of heart. Is it unrealistic to wish that some of the ‘bad guys’ may also have that same encounter with the same Jew, if we all prayed hard enough? Or am I nutty?

Good Wednesday evening…i hope i get at least a few (dis)likes to my post.

mercy

The Second Amendment

kunju,

i’m with you, more or less. with a caveat.

if we solved racism altogether, if we removed all vestiges of the abomination that was slavery, and the confederate flag, if we had only loving homes and Christian teachings, if we somehow stopped terrorism dead on its feet, if we eliminated police over-reach, we’d still have the massacre of little children in a CT elementary school, the slaughter of movie-goers in a Colorado theater and in a columbine (CO) high school, we’d still have the Arizona mall shooting that killed a bunch and gravely injured a congresswoman.

The common denominator in all this is the gun: the lack of its control and the easy access to it.

Now, i have the utmost reverence for the United States constitution, and the founding fathers who constructed it in elegant prose. i agree it should not be changed at every whim. but we have amended it 27 times. before the 19th, i, as a woman, couldn’t vote.

So it’s time to revisit this idea of, ‘the right to bear arms’, which was written when the roaming outlaws could hurt the pioneers living on the frontier plains, and it was designed to give them the right to protect themselves and theirs from harm, and the word ‘militia’ is in there somewhere, too.

We have moved out from the wild west and the barren plains and advanced to strong laws and stricter policing, but a whole lot of crazies (sorry, i couldn’t think of a better word) are buying guns the same way i buy milk. and they can decide to snap at any time.

I’m with the president on this one. imagine that! he’s right, no advanced nation has this kind of mass killings from within. Europeans are appalled with this kind of gun proliferation, and miffed by our seeming inertia towards it. In a bit of irony, they hold dear the right to free speech the way Americans hold gun rights.

Having said all this, i have no idea how we’ll go about to bring change on this one, so that some day, simple folks studying the Holy Scripture in the peacefulness of a church sanctuary will go home to tell about it.

on a positive note, this time around, there is only ‘one side’ to this tragedy. no two sides as to who was in the right.

regards to Susy, and happy summer solstice…

mercy
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Anitha’s Step – One For The Ages

“All things are according to God’s plan and decision; and God chose us to be his own people in union with Christ because of His own purpose, based on what He had decided from the very beginning.” Ephesians 1:11

Happy 2015!

Last Sunday was an ordinary day at the Carmel Marthoma Church of Boston. except that it wasn’t.
It was an extra-ordinary day.
Although it happened to fittingly coincide with the final day of a long-planned and well-organized youth conference, that’s not what set it apart.

For the first time in the Malankara Marthoma Syrian Church’s 180-year history, just as the service got under way, a twenty three-year-old young lady named Anitha Oommen, gingerly climbed up the short steps of the Carmel church’s madhbaha, to serve as a ‘deacon’, and swiftly rode into history books.

A job reserved only for the male members of the church has now suddenly become available to the other half, or as some would say, the ‘better half’, of the members.

Eve may have come after Adam, but now occupies equal space and place. The curtain did tear into two.

What may have been a ‘small step’ for the petite anitha, was a ‘giant leap’ for our church populace, the institution itself.

Close to some teen years younger than our youngest daughter, this youth leader with a ready smile my two shy granddaughters took an instant liking to, at a church summer bible school, Anitha has now become a trailblazer.

A woman ‘kapiyar’ in a MarThoma palli!

Although never one to fit the definition of a ‘feminist’ by any stretch, and as one who is always happy to be in the care of my husband, the picture of ‘Anitha’s Step’, that was posted on Facebook by some well-wisher, surprised me with a lump in my throat.
I’m translating that ‘lumpy’ sentiment into prose.

This stratospherical achievement must have been the work of many, many peoples’ thoughts and imaginations, deliberate contemplations and deep-felt prayers, and perhaps some legwork, that spanned months or years, but even the Almighty would give the first credit to our Geevarghese mar Thoedosius thirumeni, the episcopa of the diocese of North America and Europe for the Marthoma church.

It took the divine confluence of a prophetic priest who made the leap, an eager, willing woman who took the step, and the members of a progressive parish that stepped up, to arrive at this momentous mile-marker. at the right time and the right place. all willing to answer ‘The Call’.

To call thirumeni a visionary is akin to saying, Neil Armstrong must have been a good engineering student at Purdue University. An understatement and stating the obvious. Our church, and particularly our diocese have been fortunate for the last 7 years to have thirumeni as our high priest. His superior intellect and his far-reaching vision were gifts to us.

And I’m so glad he ‘ran out of excuses’ (to quote thirumeni himself) for the persistent question of our youth, ‘why can’t girls do all the things in church, as the boys?’

Coming from arguably the most patriarchal culture in the world, it would’ve been easier instead for thirumeni, to hang onto the argument that it is our ‘tradition’ and therefore valid. and thirumeni admitted that was the only rationale he could offer in the end, and it wasn’t enough. Not for a body of Christ.

In addition to all else, during his sabbatical as our bishop, thirumeni opened my eyes to certain profound biblical truths:
this ‘pretend bible know-it-all’ learned for the first time:
– one, Jesus’ words on the cross ‘woman, behold your son; son, here’s your mother’ were the ‘seeding’ of the first ‘church’, an entity where people who are not blood-related taking care of each other as family.
– Two, Jesus’ words ‘I Am The Way’ is not meant to be just a doctrinal mandate or dogma by which to exclude others, but rather, what Jesus commanded us to do is to: ‘follow me, do and behave as I do, follow my exact way’.

thank you, thirumeni.

and anitha, you go girl! How did you end up with one of my favourite last names?!