Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Kunju,

Your post made me long for Pan Am. and TWA. There was a time when America was Pan Am and Pan Am was America.

Now we have American, United, Delta. And of course, Spirit, the airline that brings your spirit down as it soars into the sky. It offers you a discount if you fly, not standby, but standing.

There’s no love lost between us and them.

Before Reaganomics, Reagan Revolution and Supply Side Economics, and David Stockman’s Trickle-Down Theory, before president Ronald Reagan de-regulated the airline industry, and before Islamic terror took grip of our psyche, and when TSA used to be just 3 syllables of the English alphabet, and not a part of our airport nightmare, air travel used to be mostly carefree, rather expensive and therefore infrequent, and you used to get a seat. A real one.

Fast forward to the future: 2017.

American, that great innovator in air travel, decided that those allergy-inducing peanuts were costing, well, more than just peanuts, and substituted them with that gourmet food called pretzels in a bag (where there was more bag than pretzels) and started charging us.

Next came the bag fees.

So folks became resourceful and instead of checking the bags, started to cram an entire week’s worth of belongings into a so-called carry-on, bulging out to the sides, on board.

It just gets better from there. To recline or not to recline. This is the question. One has to crouch, worried that one is going to elbow-bump the next seat’s already out-of-sync passenger. This is the point at which you wish you had been bumped from the flight.

So the passengers are on edge. Cabin crew is over the edge and into the deep, dealing with disgruntled passengers, irate for not being helped to stick the bulging into the overhead. ‘The Crouching Travelers become Hidden Dragons’.

And now the pilots, not to feel left out and outwitted, have joined in the action.

Airlines meanwhile are looking for additional ways to squeeze out the max for the mini (profit and comfort respectively).

So they hire Harvard MBA’s (sorry, Sushila, not you!) who do extensive and years-long research, and come up with ingenious ideas such as if you shave off a foot width from each seat, you can add 40 more passengers per row.

And as if this isn’t enough, they have us go through the upper crust cabin, where the ruling class is sitting with fluffed pillows at the back, margaritas in hand, and Ralph Lauren cotton slippers on feet, throwing pitiful glances at the Proletariat, dragging their sorry suitcases down the crammed isles.

Has anybody noticed how all this brouhaha from throwing punches never happens in first class?

A recent Washington post headline read, I kid you not, ‘Much-loved giant rabbit found dead after United flight to O’Hare’. The poor rodent (of the phylum Chordata) was most likely petrified of his Homo Sapiens fellow travelers and may have died of acute shock.

This scenario is not going to bring out the best in mankind any time soon, that’s for sure.

So I suggest we should just take to the air on ‘a wing and a prayer’. And may be JetBlue.

Happy Saturday all, from rainy New England

The Back Story – 03.04.16

Our little guy is now a week old.

And in our Seattle household, ‘All Quiet On The Western Front’, has morphed into just the name of an old movie.

Meanwhile, I got to musing more:

According to the Kerala Syrian Christian inheritance practices, (again to repeat myself with that word by making it sound like we’re some kind of chosen people!), Thampi, being the youngest of 2 sons of Achayan (his dad), had inherited the family house.

So if our nuclear family had been making India our home for the last half century, Mekhala being the youngest of 3 girls with no brothers, would have inherited our Pallipad house. To make it more cumbersome, prior to their marriage, David would’ve had to agree to this set-up, because this would mean he would give up the same rights from his family.

And Will being the only son of Mekhala, youngest or not, would be poised to inherit it subsequently.

So how fitting is it that Will is named after the original owners of the house, P. (Panackal) A. (Abraham) Eapen: Achayan, Will’s great grandfather, and also Achayan’s grandfather. Achayan’s name, in conformance with the custom, was naturally from his grandfather Abraham Eapen.

So Will and his great, great, great, grandfathers. That’s three ‘greats’. They Make up the substance of this story. life has turned full circle.

God answers prayers. If not always, at some point. If not now, some day when you’re not looking.

And what I would give to see Achayan’s face right now.

Achayan was an only child of his parents.

When we ended up with 6 daughters between his only 2 sons, Achayan used to say half-jokingly, that all the desperate prayers of valli-amachy (his mother) pleading with God to grant her at least one girl, were finally answered in the form of 6 girls years later, but with no boys in the mix.

I have no clue why Amachy didn’t beg for another boy, you know, as in ‘an heir and a spare’ as they say in the British Kingdom, but she wanted a daughter.

The family lore is that Amachy, who was from Thalavadi Amprayil family, once went to the Edathua ‘perunal’, which was right next door, and did a ‘nercha’, but kept it an ‘open secret’, because ‘good’ MarThomas were not permitted to participate in ‘nercha’. I think she pledged a few chicks to the palli or something.

Achayan had 2 daughters who ended up with 4 sons between them, but they didn’t ‘count’(!), as you all well know why.

I’m not certain how many of our progeny are cognizant of the fact that we come from such a methodically configured culture.

And there would be rancor if anyone tried to break the mold. And mostly no one did.

Say what you will about the apparent male chauvinism involved in all this – I’d rather call it patriarchy – but what it did also, was to create an order, at a time when we needed to keep it all together.

The second, third, and beyond, generations would undoubtedly benefit from being conscious of our past, no matter how far removed they are from it.

Past can always inform the future. For better or for worse.

So now ‘Back To The Future’:

When we had Mekhala, after having 2 girls, and Thampi’s brother having had 2 girls (then another one later), everyone including my parents were anticipating the ‘answers to all their prayers’ in the form of a boy, as an inheritor of the family name, the house, and the so-called wealth. Achayan used to call our Pallipad house Mekhala’s.

What transpired next: so Mekhala was born 11 days past her due date. When no easy phone service from the US was available back home, the whole universe – which meant the family and a whole lot of neighbors – were anxiously awaiting the news to hear if the ‘heir apparent’ had arrived.

And on February 20th, the whole village awoke to see the telegram guy bicycling towards the Kochupurackal house, and within moments, as cousin Kunjachayan’s daughter Susy was seen running away from the house in tears, and our beloved Kuttan asking helplessly ‘thampi thampuranu pinnem oru pennano?’, word spread like wildfire that ‘poor’ hapless Kochupurackal Babychayan had another girl grandbaby. Milling around the house courtyard, they sympathized as best as they could, with Achayan and Amachy. “vidhiya, babychaya, kochame – entho cheyyana”.

Valli-amachy gave away too many chicks. 🙂

By the way, all 3 of our daughters have heard this story more times they can count, so don’t feel bad about breaking this to them gently. I was also one of the souls who shed tears that February day.

Years later, would I change a thing about that girl baby or any part of experience? The answer is: emphatically no, no way on earth.

And little did anyone imagine their prayers will be answered in the form of one Will Stephen Fentin.

Call it a willful Will or God’s will.

I felt really compelled to share this as a post-script to my posting from last week.

While doing so, I was also imagining David, Mekhala, Laila, Nora and Will, living in our Pallipad house – which no longer exists, not even one brick of it.

Regardless, it was fun picturing them living next door to Pandarathil Thankachayan (a relative), Percattu Kunjumon, Krishnan, Venu, et al.

The best was visualizing Kunjipennu drawing water from the well, and Thomachen, the vegetable vendor haggling over the price of one-day-too-old achinga.

And imagine, these things didn’t happen in Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro, the ancient sites of the Indus Valley Civilization, it was just some 30 plus years ago, and it happened in that watery dip called Kerala’s Upper Kuttanad.

From Travancore to Seattle. From deep Southern India to the Northwestern United States. I found it hard to wrap my head around it.

Anyway, thank you for indulging me, and allowing me to reminisce. I had fun. I’m sure some of you stopped reading long ago, like at the half-way mark. 🙂

————-

And further with the movies theme, as sweet Will was taking his sweet time last week, contemplating when to come out head first to say hello! to the world, he granted ample time for Ammi to teach his big sister (all of 6 years old) how to make yogurt at home, who was fascinated it could even be done, and also to see ‘Trumbo’ and ‘The Martian’. Go see it.

Very fondly,

mercy

Iraq And Syria

It’s a pity, nobody has called me from Washington yet to get my valuable insight on the grim happenings in Syria, which have clawed its way into a seemingly tranquil Europe.

So you guys are it: my audience.

Nothing further needs to be said about a people, who made available to us the profound ideas of equality, fraternity, and liberty: concepts rooted in a Judeo-Christian ideology.

Never mind, the French may have given up on the Christian part of it long ago, but the tenets remain, etched into the French psyche. The beautiful Notre dame, a structure we visited in 1974 with our infant daughter nisha, is sitting there very pretty and very empty.

So after the killing spree at the offices of the French cartoonists in January of this year, the French were said to be despairing over the stubborn resistance to assimilation on the part of the millions, whom they welcomed to their land, to live and to let live.

The next thing they knew, those very rights they fought a revolution over, 4 centuries ago, had become endangered, or been put on the threshold of being eliminated altogether.

The Bikini or the Burqa.

That clash of values catapulted us to what happened last week.

As we see all sorts of added and painful security measures being elevated all over Europe, and across the Atlantic, questions have arisen over how to handle the refugee migrants from a God-forsaken place called Syria.

Ironically, and aside from the rest of the story at hand, some of us call ourselves ‘Syrian Christians’. I don’t think there are any Christians left in Syria. Perhaps we should rename ourselves ‘Suriyani christhianis’. only the ‘suriyanis’ will know what to make of that term.

Anyway, instead of vilifying the governors and the presidential candidates for suggesting we put a lid on the ‘Great Migration’, I have come up with the following. I’m sure some of you are going to tell me, ‘you’re kidding, right’? and it’s ok to do that, and I am not.

Google came to my aid, and I discovered that there are roughly 350,000 Christian congregations in the U.S.

Assuming most of them possess their own sanctuaries, I propose that each of the churches adopt one refugee family each, and house them right in their sanctuaries. Giving sanctuary in a sanctuary.

If you think I’m being facetious, I am not.

In return for this, this guest family can help the churches with moderate amounts of housekeeping, until they’re on their feet, and can move onward. Kind of like W’s ‘Faith Initiative’. and it’s 340,000 more than what the president is edicting.

and on that note: what’s up with the president going abroad, and going around questioning Ted Cruz’s patriotism? isn’t it the same as when his patriotism was called into question? the Filipinos are probably confused.

All the vetting, that word we’re hearing a lot these days, (initially I thought this meant putting some water over the head of these people ), will be the responsibility of the sponsoring church. And the church will also be liable for any adverse outcomes.

Thanksgiving is fast approaching and I have a story to tell. Just bear with me a bit more.

Once a time long ago, I was the food co-coordinator for my church Carmel MarThoma. poor folks, they haven’t got over it yet, and have not invited me back to repeat the performance.

thanksgiving rolled around that year, and I foolishly came up with the the novel idea of us, the church folks, preparing the whole thanksgiving meal, turkey and the sides, and openly inviting the Hudson townspeople to share it with us.

I was surprised by the resistance to the proposal, on the grounds of safety mainly, and other matters. I’m not blaming anyone. I haven’t invited townsfolk to my house, ever. I’m just suggesting, we have a different approach when something directly impacts our daily lives.

It’s getting a little tiresome to be repeatedly exhorted of our Christian duty to care for the least advantaged. No argument there. It’s right there in Matthew’s Gospel. This may be arguably the most quoted Gospel verse. No problem with that either.

but is it possible, Jesus may have meant, we the individuals, you and I, take care of this? and not putting it on Caesar’s head, and be done with it?

as a fact, Jesus never exhorted Caesar to do anything.

Next point in this business of the blame game is, that of giving preference to ‘Christian’ refugees.

We can opt out of this dilemma by offering to take people over 50, with no extended families accompanying them. No religious litmus test will then be necessary. It will still be better than the ‘all or nothing’ stand.

Some of us are suffering from this malady called, The Bias of Lowered Expectations (BLE). What is good for the goose is not good for the gander. Some are expected to do only the ‘least of their best’.

why don’t we expect Saudi Arabia to take in half the number of refugees, with whom they share a religion, language, and a culture, that are being sent to Europe? Why is it OK for the Saudis to stand idly by, but not for the Europeans? Isn’t caring for widows and orphans mandated in their holy book?

I wonder if Jesus said anything about double standards? WWJS(ay)?

Apostle Paul was a supremely learned Jew, a pharisee, on his way to Damascus in Syria, to kill the newly minted Christians in AD 33 or so, but lucky for us, he had an Encounter With A Good Jew and he had a change of heart. Is it unrealistic to wish that some of the ‘bad guys’ may also have that same encounter with the same Jew, if we all prayed hard enough? Or am I nutty?

Good Wednesday evening…i hope i get at least a few (dis)likes to my post.

mercy

The Kentucky Clerk And The US Constitution

The Kentucky clerk is back in the news, which is unfortunate for her and for us.

The media come up with these catch names for the characters of their stories, such as ‘Kennedy cousin’, ‘Arizona shooter’, the NY prison worker, and so on, in lieu of their real names. If i said, Kim Davis, you’ll say, Kim who? so, she’s now refusing to claim the licenses are being issued by her office, thus making it invalid or something like it.

Now, i do appreciate this woman’s Christian fervor. I really do. But it seems that she missed a pertinent part of her high school civics class. It must have been the day she was out with the flu, or else she’d have clearly known that the US constitution is the supreme law of the land. Any religious governance is subservient to that. Her church’s cannons cannot supersede what the Supremes have decided. She doesn’t have to like it, she just has to obey.

This brings me to a number of years ago, to the day i proudly appeared for the interview process, as part of my application to become a US citizen. As many, or all of you may know, there is a guide book you can study, to ace the interview. My husband had gone through the process a few years prior, but when the time came, in my know-it-all fashion :), I declared I didn’t need this book. ‘hah! I know all about US history, geography and the political process.’ He kept urging me to at least read the book once to be aware of what kind of questions will be asked. Sad to admit, I’m not typically known for my obedience 😦 , so I went to Boston’s Government Center, without so much as ever glancing at the book. Frankly, in my own defense, I expected questions of the sort, ‘who was our first president’, ‘where is the US capital’, etc.

So, this guy who was interviewing me, assessed rather early in the game, that I was being a ‘smart alec’ and proceeded to one-up me, and started asking ‘secondary’ questions to, I’m sure, trip me up.

He asked: what is the constitution?

Me: it is the law of the land.

Interviewer: what kind of law?

I was thinking to myself, (but didn’t say it out loud): is there more than one kind?

Interviewer: what is the qualifying part of it?

Me: silence. what?

I was miffed. We’re allowed one or two (max) wrong answers, and he was determined to catch me on this one. And, to his delight, I simply didn’t know. Then he ‘smart-aleced’ me back and said: you should know, it is the ‘supreme’ law of the land. He almost gave me a mischievous look that seemed to suggest that I failed. But then he found some mercy(!) deep in his inner being and let me go. He may as well not have wanted to deal with me one more time. 🙂

So for the law: the word ‘supreme’ covers it all. I had known the gist of that even before, but this episode with the astute government clerk, who didn’t want to let me off the hook that easily, cemented it for me, and it has stuck. The courts will always try to stay out of thorny situations, but if someone decided to bring a lawsuit, the rulings will have to side with the law.

Which brings me to a more current story. Recently, a Muslim woman filed a lawsuit against a budget airline, that she couldn’t and wouldn’t serve alcohol to passengers in flight, because it was against her religion. Oh, brother. An obvious option for her in this case would have been to step aside from that job, and find something else to do. But, why choose the obvious option when you can pick the more contentious one, right?

This is America after all. Home of the brave, and land of the free money. God bless America.

So, she went to court to make the airline bend policy for her. Alas for us, airlines operate on minimum staff (for better or for worse), and if one purposely won’t perform her part of the job description, what is the option they’re left with?

I then found it astonishing, that the same folks who’re unhappy with the Kentucky clerk are the ones who thought the flight attendant had a case. No harm in a little double standard. right?! Freedom to practice one’s religion. The first amendment.

I know the government is not the same as a private employer, but the emotions, that precipitate out of these polarizing situations, are the same. I’m principally opposed to the death penalty. Only a God who created us in His image has the right to take it away. But do I think the courts should make it illegal based on the pope’s exhortations? Probably not. However, the High Court’s clerks are welcome to comb through the law books to find some loophole by which the justices can put it in place. By all means, yes, and please do.

But Exodus 20:13 (Ahimsa), should not be the basis for the law. It can only, but certainly, guide our core values and our conscience.

Similarly, abortion is like adultery. bad, bad, bad. wrong, wrong, wrong. We should never commit it. But should we legislate it and make it illegal? I think not.

Hope you’re enjoying the wall-to-wall coverage of the Bishop of Rome. A twenty-first century man who resembles a first century Carpenter from Nazareth. may God go with him.

Happy Saturday… mercy

Border Insecurity and The Donald

Kunju,

Well, this one is tricky. Now, don’t just move to the conclusion that I’m a Trump fan.

It happened like this. when the media first reported that Trump may run for the 2016 election, I was like, ‘here we go again’. Remember, he had made the same attempt four years ago. Then when he actually announced, I went, ‘you’re kidding, right’?

At the juncture where, what he said to Megyn Kelly and about her, and especially what Megyn said what he had said to some apprentice contestant, all came out, is when I found it all beyond offensive, and rolled up the welcome mat from under him. He somehow didn’t slip.

If he had said those tired, old lines to anyone in my company, he’s the one who’d be ‘fired’.

Then it was like, wait a minute … to, well, now.

His first pronouncement about illegals and the way the media got on his case, I remember thinking, ‘he didn’t mean all immigrants, come on guys, he was talking about illegals’. To me, the terms ‘undocumented immigrants’ (a term coined by the NY Times) and ‘illegal immigrants’ are the same. It only means that they crossed the border illegally to come here.

Now, someone is going to yell at me and say, we’re all immigrants, America is made up of immigrants, the first pilgrims were illegals, blah, blah, blah. It creates a good sound bite, but we all know that that’s not what we’re talking about here.

Just take the case of Mexico.

Now, no one from Washington has called and asked me to be part of a ‘think tank’ to find solutions to our border insecurity, but I’ll offer my valuable (or laughable?) ideas on how to stem the flow of illegals.

First, why don’t we export the American governing systems of free enterprise, law and order, and democracy, to Mexico, so that this country with enormous amounts of natural resources (human and earth), can become the envy of the Western Hemisphere? I’m well aware of the studied notion that, people similar to animals in the wild, go where the food supply is. In which case, why don’t we help them find food where they are? Like, teaching to fish, instead of giving fish, so to speak?

Second, dismantle ‘the Department of Customs and Border Protection’, and let people come and go as they please, kind of like, when I go to Connecticut and back. On my return, I’m greeted with a ‘Welcome to Massachusetts’ sign every time. 🙂

What’s the point of paying the feds top salaries to man the operation, and then claiming it to be inhumane, when they actually do their jobs? It’d be a blessing if we don’t have to stand in line after a 24-hour flight from kochi, anyway. kudos to the feds, once I got fined $25.00 for bringing in $2.00 worth of curry leaves. 😦 All the more reason to get rid of it. 🙂

Third,  don’t laugh, we can make Mexico our fifty-first state.

That way, no one will have to jump the ‘Trump Wall’. I know it sounds preposterous, but it is no more so, than providing for ‘anchor babies’ for life. The last two states were annexed in my lifetime. I remember when it went from 48 to 50. What’s one more? 🙂

Now, somebody has decided ‘anchor babies’ is a bad word. Oh, brother! This is how Trump gets traction.

Anyway, back to our friend, Mister Trump.

What’s so abominable about saying we should first hire ‘American’ citizens for American jobs, before we invite foreign nationals? Isn’t it the job of the president to take care of his citizens before he does the same for the rest of the world? He’s our president, not our pastor.

It costs an arm, and a leg, and then a house, and then some, (and no kidding!) to college-educate children in this country, in any discipline.

When all is done, and the kids and their sorry parents are out of exorbitant amounts of cash, they’re competing in the marketplace with young adults who did university for 1000 rupees, and who can then afford to take jobs at a lesser pay. See the vicious cycle? We’re talking about our kids here.

What about Sundar Pichai, Satya Nadella, and the parents of Vivek Murthy? you say. Oh, May be, we can make a special visa category for South Indian Brahmins, there is some sort of a pattern here, don’t you think? 🙂

Also, perhaps we can consider temporarily employing the folks on California’s unemployment payrolls, to pick grapes, so that the grapes don’t rot in the sun as somebody lamented?

Really, Trump is echoing commonly-felt concerns. People are tired of the P-C-ness, which is a just nicer word for disingenuousness, bordering on fakery. Vilifying Capitalism on the one hand, and allowing other nationals to seek jobs here on the other, is an extreme form of this. Claiming our democracy is not well-functioning, and then wanting to offer asylum to war-zone refugees is another.

It’s a novelty when a politician speaks the truth. Trump tells it like it is, in his world view. Folks are flocking to him for this reason and nothing else. In the end, they may not even vote for him.

Citizens are silenced into keeping mum for fear of being called heartless, homophobic, xenophobic, racist, nationalistic, un-Christian, and what not, by the dominant media, and the land that gave us the precious ‘right to freedom of expression’ is gradually chipping away at our ‘freedom to express’. The free press is stifling free speech. Not a good plan.

I don’t think Jesus would approve of all this name-calling.

As Christians, I realize we’re mandated to see that the least fortunate among us are taken care of, but somehow, I don’t think that includes rich Chinese women who give birth here to anchor their babies to the soil.

I would have said that ‘the Donald’ has the chance of a snowball in hell, to even get the party’s nomination, let alone win the national election, but, If he does, I’ll be concerned about how it appears to the world, to have a bellicose leader in the pattern of Hugo Chaves, as the leader of the free world. Even in death, Hugo is remembered for having said, ‘death to America’, and not for the free heating oil he provided to the needy of Dorchester, Massachusetts. When he died, president Obama eulogized him, by saying he’s glad Hugo has gone on to meet his Maker, and it couldn’t have happened any sooner, or something to that effect. Oh brother!

Nate silver is predicting that Donald won’t make it to the finish line. we’ll see. win or lose, he’ll have started ‘the Conversation’.

Regards to Susy and Happy Monday evening.

‘Time to buy’… and don’t sell…:)

mercy

Pursuit Of Peace

Raphael,

No argument there. We should pursue peace. How we go about, is the question.

I’m not in favour of any position that first and foremost states, that we don’t spend enough on foreign aid, we violate human rights, Christians are just as bad in using religion to kill, all white people are racists, this, that, and the other.

And I’m not in favour of a president who uses willful manipulation to draw outrageous parallels between Guantanamo bay and videotaped killings. Between events from a thousand years ago, to what happened yesterday.

His narrative is always, America is great, with ‘but we have done some bad things’. It should be reversed, It should be with the preface, ‘we have committed some grave mistakes, but it is still the greatest country in the world’. we have repented, made amends, and we’re in a far better place.

If we all acknowledge this is the best nation in the world to unpack our bags for a good long time, (not to visit on occasion, or veg out on a beach), then we can go somewhere with this discussion on how to pursue peace.

What is so intellectual or fashionable about bashing white folks, Christians, and Jews, but not others, and other religions?

After only a quick read, I do agree with a couple of stands in this article. One, I‘m against torture of any kind under any circumstances, period. It hurts my fiber to think that humans inflict pain on others on purpose. I have walked out of movies that show gratuitous violence, as my husband can attest; all the while acknowledging that it was the ‘water boarding’ of Khalid Sheik Mohammed that brought us the first tip, in 2005, on how to locate bin laden. I gloss over it by pretending it was just putting a little water on KSM’s head!

I’m also not for putting our men in harm’s way in the quagmire that is called Iraq.

so, how do we do it, you ask. I don’t know. The nation that put a man on the moon should be able to figure it out.

Anyway, you expected to hear from me, right?

I love America, not as in a, it’s-the-best-but-it-can-be-better, kind of way. The best, period. And I think the CIA and the navy SEALs are awesome, they’re doing their jobs, so i can sit in my warm house and use my ‘freedom to express’. And I’m glad all of you are my friends. Keep safe as your plow through the snow this weekend… mercy


America, How Do I love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways!

I don’t know many of you in Kunju’s email chain, nevertheless I’m writing blindly, with the hope that you won’t use your ‘right to free speech’ and yell at me.

I am ‘center right’ on fiscal matters, but am pro gun control. The second amendment hasn’t found a space in the Indian-American psyche, I believe. I don’t ever want to touch a gun, let alone think that we should all own guns to protect ourselves from intruders.

Having got that sentiment out of the way, let me answer this one question posed by Minoo Verghese, the writer of this email.

‘Wonder why most of you preferred to settle in the so called “country of the brave and the free” – I’m guessing not for the freedom but for the moolah, whatever.

Let me count the ways. Why I love America and why I have chosen to stay here for close to half a century.

-For the rights, ‘endowed on us by our creator’ and embedded into our constitution by one of the greatest men ever lived, Thomas Jefferson – my ‘rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness’. If I get killed by a mad gunman tomorrow, my ‘right to life’ will have ended. So can it have ended traversing through some of the chaotic roads in Ernakulam.

-For the ‘Judeo-Christian’ principle that God created us all in His image, one that is at the bedrock of the ‘western’ value that all ‘men’, the rich and the destitute, have the same worth in the eyes of God and man. This translates to: if I had the misfortune of ending up at the MGH (arguably the world’s most premier hospital) tomorrow, I don’t have to have my nephew’s brother-in-law’s wife working there to get a single doctor to even shoot a glance in my direction. if one lowly among us is kidnapped across enemy lines, the 82nd airborne is dispatched to the rescue.

-My privilege to get up every morning, indulge in a hot shower (without water allocation), put on a fresh set of ‘LLBean’ clothes, and drive my own little Toyota Camry, and park in our $7B company’s parking lot with ease. my bosses are Bill and Matt, not ‘sir’.

-My right to not to have to bribe my way through the bureaucracy to renew my driver’s license.

-For a good glass of Merlot, a juicy hamburger, ‘Lenox’ fine bone china, Red Sox in August, Super Bowl in February, and movies with Brad Pitt (‘Moneyball’ comes to mind, if you haven’t seen it, please do).

-Where I can argue with my ‘bleeding-heart’ daughters and my friends on the merits of fiscal prudence.

-For not having to squirrel away my entire life savings and my inheritance, to see my three daughters married.

-For being able to go on a safari in Kenya, and to see ‘Mama Mia’ on Broadway while taking in the ‘Big Apple’.

-To be living in the only country in the world where i can drink municipal tap water.

When we bash ‘white people’ for all the ills of the world, accusing them of aiming to forcefully conform the whole world to the ‘American or European way’, please bear in mind, that it’s the same race that gave us William Shakespeare and ‘Hamlet’, Michelangelo and the ‘Sistine Chapel’, Henry Ford and the world’s first assembly line, the Wrights brothers and the jet airplane, Penicillin and 8-lane freeways, JFK and the ‘moonshot’, the steam engine, the wheel, Steve jobs and ‘Apple’, and surely, the Magna Carta which is the very source of the noble idea of ‘one man to one vote’ (democracy). And who can dismiss ‘Google’?

Need I go on with the names? Like Galileo, Magellan and Copernicus? Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton, and Thomas Edison?

In all fairness, would the ‘native’ Americans or this continent have been better off, if the ‘white man’ who gave us the ‘Declaration Of Independence’ and ‘The Bill Of Rights’, never set foot on its shores?

The ‘proof is in the pudding’, folks.
This country has been the last and the best hope of the earth, ever since a bunch of Anglo-Saxons settled in Jamestown, VA, and introduced the world to capitalism and free enterprise, and people all over the world haven’t stopped since, standing in ‘snake lines’, in scorching heat and blistering cold, in front of US consulates all over the globe, to get that coveted document called an American Visa. When the same happens in front of the Chinese, Indian, Ugandan and Lithuanian consulates, then we can claim they also have the same rights and opportunities, and desirable governments.

And to answer that first question by Minoo one further time, we may have all come here in pursuit of the two ‘Big Greens’, one with a picture of George Washington on it, and another in the size of a wallet card. but it’s undeniably the basic human rights that have pulled and kept us in.

Merry Christmas and a happy 2013, and
Peace On Earth..