Pursuit Of Peace

Raphael,

No argument there. We should pursue peace. How we go about, is the question.

I’m not in favour of any position that first and foremost states, that we don’t spend enough on foreign aid, we violate human rights, Christians are just as bad in using religion to kill, all white people are racists, this, that, and the other.

And I’m not in favour of a president who uses willful manipulation to draw outrageous parallels between Guantanamo bay and videotaped killings. Between events from a thousand years ago, to what happened yesterday.

His narrative is always, America is great, with ‘but we have done some bad things’. It should be reversed, It should be with the preface, ‘we have committed some grave mistakes, but it is still the greatest country in the world’. we have repented, made amends, and we’re in a far better place.

If we all acknowledge this is the best nation in the world to unpack our bags for a good long time, (not to visit on occasion, or veg out on a beach), then we can go somewhere with this discussion on how to pursue peace.

What is so intellectual or fashionable about bashing white folks, Christians, and Jews, but not others, and other religions?

After only a quick read, I do agree with a couple of stands in this article. One, I‘m against torture of any kind under any circumstances, period. It hurts my fiber to think that humans inflict pain on others on purpose. I have walked out of movies that show gratuitous violence, as my husband can attest; all the while acknowledging that it was the ‘water boarding’ of Khalid Sheik Mohammed that brought us the first tip, in 2005, on how to locate bin laden. I gloss over it by pretending it was just putting a little water on KSM’s head!

I’m also not for putting our men in harm’s way in the quagmire that is called Iraq.

so, how do we do it, you ask. I don’t know. The nation that put a man on the moon should be able to figure it out.

Anyway, you expected to hear from me, right?

I love America, not as in a, it’s-the-best-but-it-can-be-better, kind of way. The best, period. And I think the CIA and the navy SEALs are awesome, they’re doing their jobs, so i can sit in my warm house and use my ‘freedom to express’. And I’m glad all of you are my friends. Keep safe as your plow through the snow this weekend… mercy


Nicholson Syrian Girls’ High School

Right from its initial years, many women speakers have made a great impact on the Maramon Convention. Mrs. F.S. Nicholson and Miss. S.C. McKibbin conducted special meetings and Bible classes for women during the convention in 1905. They are remembered for their devoted service to the women of Travancore, particularly in the education field. They established the prestigious Nicholson Syrian Girls Higher Secondary School and Training Home in 1910 at Kattode, Tiruvalla, Kerala.

.https://nalloorlibrary.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/founders.jpg?w=450&h=266

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MY SCHOOL! I am who I am, for better or for worse, in large part due to the vision of the two ladies mentioned in this article, one an affluent widow who wanted to use her inherited wealth for a cause she believed in deeply, namely girls’ education, and another one a single lady who shared a commitment to the same cause.

And our church, The Malankara Mar Thoma Church, was passionate enough in educating girls, to take up the project and ‘run with it’.

In my younger days, Nicholson Syrian Girls’ High School was one of the premier boarding schools for girls in Kerala. Thus my mother, my sister, one of my first cousins, and 2 of my aunts were all graduates of this great institution. I learned English grammar, using the ‘Wren and Martin’ Oxford grammar book in 1960. And if these two ladies spoke at the ‘Maramon’ convention, it was just all the more fitting of their personalities, and the innovative, and far-sighted character of our church. Thanks for the post, Das Athyal. The school was founded in 1910.

Anitha’s Step – One For The Ages

“All things are according to God’s plan and decision; and God chose us to be his own people in union with Christ because of His own purpose, based on what He had decided from the very beginning.” Ephesians 1:11

Happy 2015!

Last Sunday was an ordinary day at the Carmel Marthoma Church of Boston. except that it wasn’t.
It was an extra-ordinary day.
Although it happened to fittingly coincide with the final day of a long-planned and well-organized youth conference, that’s not what set it apart.

For the first time in the Malankara Marthoma Syrian Church’s 180-year history, just as the service got under way, a twenty three-year-old young lady named Anitha Oommen, gingerly climbed up the short steps of the Carmel church’s madhbaha, to serve as a ‘deacon’, and swiftly rode into history books.

A job reserved only for the male members of the church has now suddenly become available to the other half, or as some would say, the ‘better half’, of the members.

Eve may have come after Adam, but now occupies equal space and place. The curtain did tear into two.

What may have been a ‘small step’ for the petite anitha, was a ‘giant leap’ for our church populace, the institution itself.

Close to some teen years younger than our youngest daughter, this youth leader with a ready smile my two shy granddaughters took an instant liking to, at a church summer bible school, Anitha has now become a trailblazer.

A woman ‘kapiyar’ in a MarThoma palli!

Although never one to fit the definition of a ‘feminist’ by any stretch, and as one who is always happy to be in the care of my husband, the picture of ‘Anitha’s Step’, that was posted on Facebook by some well-wisher, surprised me with a lump in my throat.
I’m translating that ‘lumpy’ sentiment into prose.

This stratospherical achievement must have been the work of many, many peoples’ thoughts and imaginations, deliberate contemplations and deep-felt prayers, and perhaps some legwork, that spanned months or years, but even the Almighty would give the first credit to our Geevarghese mar Thoedosius thirumeni, the episcopa of the diocese of North America and Europe for the Marthoma church.

It took the divine confluence of a prophetic priest who made the leap, an eager, willing woman who took the step, and the members of a progressive parish that stepped up, to arrive at this momentous mile-marker. at the right time and the right place. all willing to answer ‘The Call’.

To call thirumeni a visionary is akin to saying, Neil Armstrong must have been a good engineering student at Purdue University. An understatement and stating the obvious. Our church, and particularly our diocese have been fortunate for the last 7 years to have thirumeni as our high priest. His superior intellect and his far-reaching vision were gifts to us.

And I’m so glad he ‘ran out of excuses’ (to quote thirumeni himself) for the persistent question of our youth, ‘why can’t girls do all the things in church, as the boys?’

Coming from arguably the most patriarchal culture in the world, it would’ve been easier instead for thirumeni, to hang onto the argument that it is our ‘tradition’ and therefore valid. and thirumeni admitted that was the only rationale he could offer in the end, and it wasn’t enough. Not for a body of Christ.

In addition to all else, during his sabbatical as our bishop, thirumeni opened my eyes to certain profound biblical truths:
this ‘pretend bible know-it-all’ learned for the first time:
– one, Jesus’ words on the cross ‘woman, behold your son; son, here’s your mother’ were the ‘seeding’ of the first ‘church’, an entity where people who are not blood-related taking care of each other as family.
– Two, Jesus’ words ‘I Am The Way’ is not meant to be just a doctrinal mandate or dogma by which to exclude others, but rather, what Jesus commanded us to do is to: ‘follow me, do and behave as I do, follow my exact way’.

thank you, thirumeni.

and anitha, you go girl! How did you end up with one of my favourite last names?!